The Bird Report

This morning’s bird watching was very successful which I could attribute to the warmer weather but I think it is mostly to the credit of the attendants, practicing and advancing their skills.

I am very pleased that those attending may not necessarily know the name of the bird, but are developing their identification skills. I am overjoyed when they notice a bird is not like the others and question these differences to find it is a new bird. If they were equipped with a bird guide I may soon find myself defunct….

These new skills led to the sighting of two spiny cheeked honeyeaters as well as being able to differentiate multiple parrot and cormorant species. Remebering the difference between a pied and little pied cormorant is no task for the faint hearted!

Little pied cormorant sitting in dead tree. Little pied cormorant has short yellow bill and long tail to body length. Photo by Emma Walton of Emma Walton Guiding a nature Guide of South East Queensland. Photo taken during a bird watching workshop by Emma Walton Guiding.

Take look at our eBird checklist below!

Next week we will be headed to a new section of the Condamine River. We will be meeting at the skatebowl car park of Queens Park.

The Bird Report

Those that have been joining me bird watching have been on a very steep learning curve. I have very much enjoyed watching them progress even in these early days. I especially love the pure joy they have for being in nature.

Bird watching this week was where the Condamine River crosses under Lyndhurst Lane. We took advantage of the low water levels and set our chairs on the spillway.

Quote of the morning

“…I’ve been looking forward to this all week…”

Highlight

The azure kingfisher fishing just a few meters ahead of us.

The Learning Curve

Those that have been joining me bird watching have been on a very steep learning curve. I have very much enjoyed watching them progress even in these early days. I especially love the pure joy they have for being in nature.

Emma with the new bird watchers at the Condamine River spillway where it runs under Lyndhurst Lane, Warwick.

Unexpected Visitors

Bird watching was temporarily interupted by two foxes scuffling on the riverbank. As the defeated ran away from the victor, it did not take the time to take in its surroundings. This meant it was only a few meters away when the mistake was realised and it made a very abrupt about-turn and its bushy tail disappeared into the rushes.

Species

Australian Wood Duck – Chenonetta jubata
Pacific Black Duck – Anas superciliosa
Hardhead – Aythya australis
Rock Dove – Columba livia
Crested Pigeon – Ocyphaps lophotes
Peaceful Dove – Geopelia placida
Dusky Moorhen – Gallinula tenebrosa
Little Pied Cormorant – Microcarbo melanoleucos
Little Black Cormorant – Phalacrocorax sulcirostris
White-faced Heron – Egretta novaehollandiae
Whistling Kite – Haliastur sphenurus
Azure Kingfisher – Ceyx azureus
Laughing Kookaburra – Dacelo novaeguineae
Galah – Eolophus roseicapilla
Little Corella – Cacatua sanguinea
Sulphur-crested Cockatoo – Cacatua galerita
Australian King-Parrot – Alisterus scapularis
Eastern Rosella – Platycercus eximius
Red-rumped Parrot – Psephotus haematonotus
Musk Lorikeet – Glossopsitta concinna
Rainbow Lorikeet – Trichoglossus haematodus
Noisy Miner – Manorina melanocephala
Grey Butcherbird – Cracticus torquatus
Australian Magpie – Gymnorhina tibicen
Torresian Crow – Corvus orru
Common Myna – Acridotheres tristis

#TATP2019

The Adventure Therapy Project is off! I was fortunate enough to be one of the service providers of the project and led the Interpretative Walk. It was a lot of fun and I hope the attendants had fun as well.

The Adventure Therapy Project is off! I was fortunate enough to be one of the service providers of the project and led the Interpretative Walk. It was a lot of fun and I hope the attendants had fun as well.

Those Questions…

Unfortuantely there are many women who are uncomfortable in the outdoors because of their biology. I would be willing to bet that many of these women would be more comfortable if they were able enough to ask for advice from other women.

“umm…Emma…?”

Several anonynmous girls and women

This quote is the start of a question that the asker is embarrassed to ask. Questions frequently include:

“umm… Emma… how do you pee in the bush?”

Anonymous woman

“umm… Emma… what would you do if you have your period?”

Woman after finding out we would not see a toilet tomorrow

“umm…Emma… Will a snake bite me while I’m… umm… yeah… If it did, how do you bandage that…?”

Woman who had learnt the toilet was a hole she would dig in the ground

Women do have extra challenges to overcome when working in the field or adventuring in the outdoors. Not to say men do not have challenges it’s just women are designed a certain way and have certain biological functions that men do not usually need to worry about.

Unfortuantely there are many women who are uncomfortable in the outdoors because of their biology. I would be willing to bet that many of these women would be more comfortable if they were able enough to ask for advice from other women.

I personally love when I am asked one of ‘those questions’. Quite frankly I am flattered that I have this person’s trust and they judge I might have a solution to their problem. Most of all, I just love being in the position to help women be comfortable in their own bodies and get them one step closer to achieving their potential.

These are all questions I can discuss with you at Hike Your Mountain.

Do you have a question you want an answer to but don’t want to ask it publicly? Submit your question via this anonymous google form

Hike Your Mountain

Hike Your Mountain- A women empowered retreat came about

I am a confident explorer. This is down to my experience and training. If the worst were to happen on a trip, I am confident in my abilities to deal with the issue. However, as an experienced explorer, I know there is an encyclopaedia worth of strategies I have in place to pretty much ensure the worst never happens.

When travelling alone I am sometimes approached by fellow travellers who tell me I am very brave for travelling alone. I don’t feel brave. I am just doing what I love and am pretty experienced at.

I want everyone, particularly women to feel that there is nothing to stop you from hiking or travelling solo. There may be hurdles and problems you have to solve but I promise that you can!

Kathryn Walton Consulting and I have teamed up to bring you, “Hike Your Mountain – A Women Empowered Retreat“. “Hike Your Mountain” is a full day retreat designed to equip you to hike solo. Together we will problem solve your questions, queries and concerns. We will also discuss a variety of topics such managing your fear factor, how to pee in the bush, growing a mindset that helps you overcome the challenges of hiking, what to do when you have your period, how to feel safe (mentally and physically) and what not to bring on a hike. We will then journey together on our hike in the hills. After our hike we will sit together, tea, coffee or hot chocolate in hand and reflect on our collective experiences and develop our personal action plans.

The hike itself will be a fairly slow paced 5-10km over the hills of the Southern Downs (venue soon to be announced!). On the hike, I will be there to help you better understand the world you are walking on (warning: I will undoubtedly get excited over a feather I have found). I will show you how to walk the land and understand it. We will also pause at opportune moments for reflection and meditation, a break for the body and the mind.

Hike Your Mountain is for all women aged 16 and over. All that you need is a basic to moderate level of fitness, a backpack, comfy walking shoes and a bottle of water. We will be providing the catering for the day, including snacks, teas and coffees and a heart-warming lunch. We will support you every step you take to hike your mountain.

The aim is to run a series of workshops that will culminate in how to overnight hike. Get on board, challenge yourself to explore.

The Grain Shed Retreat

I am now available to guide at the newly renovated, ‘The Grain Shed Retreat’ by Darling Downs Wellness Therapies! Full disability access!

I am now available to guide at the newly renovated, ‘The Grain Shed Retreat’ by Darling Downs Wellness Therapies!

The Grain Shed Retreat outside view. Verandah visible. The Grain Shed Retreat is designed for disability access. Owned and operated by NDIS service provider Darling Downs Wellness Therapies.

Stay in the Goomburra Valley, nestled against a mountain in a gorgeousely rustic cottage.

Hand crafted door in native timbers. Kitchen. Wide door. Low bench. Cow skin rug. The Grain Shed Retreat is designed for disability access. Owned and operated by NDIS service provider Darling Downs Wellness Therapies.

Yoga and massages packages available!

Cow skin rug. Corrugated iron wall. Insulated. Ample natural light. The Grain Shed Retreat is designed for disability access. Owned and operated by NDIS service provider Darling Downs Wellness Therapies.
The Grain Shed Retreat is designed for disability access. Owned and operated by NDIS service provider Darling Downs Wellness Therapies.


The Adventure Therapy Project

Pry yourself away from the hustle and bustle of modern society. Leave your worries behind and immerse yourself in wilderness. Have you ever walked into the bush and not known what to look for? Do you wish you could know more of the world around you?

So happy to finally be able to launch ‘Emma Walton Guiding’ and be a part of such a fantastic program. If you are a woman living on the Southern Downs and Granite Belt I would strongly encourage checking out some of the workshops on offer. All for FREE!


Pry yourself away from the hustle and bustle of modern society. Leave your worries behind and immerse yourself in wilderness. Know what you see when you walk. 


The Adventure Therapy Project – Interpretative Walk

Kakadu Calling

it has been really nice to be able to reflect back on the journey I have gone on since. I feel as if I have lived lifetimes within the year.

So strange thinking that is has only been a year since I was preparing to leave for the Northern Territory for my first official posting as a guide.


KAKADU CALLING: Wildlife guide finds feet after loss of ear by Marian Faa

Marian’s article resurfaced recently and it has been really nice to be able to reflect back on the journey I have gone on since. I feel as if I have lived lifetimes within the year. What I find most exciting is I epxect the next year to be even more adventurous and filled to the brim with challenges.

https://www.warwickdailynews.com.au/news/kakadu-calling-wildlife-guide-finds-feet-after-los/3363171/

Accreditation!

I am very excited to announce that I am officially a member of Professional Tour Guide Association of Australia (PTGAA) and Guiding Organisations Australia (GOA). Thanks again to everyone who came along to my accreditation, I very, very much appreciated your support. You can check my listing out by clicking the link!

https://www.ptgaa.org.au/find-a-guide/5284/emma-walton/